Conversations on Christianity, History, and Race (PDF Download for FM Partners)

This package features exclusive interviews with historians Anthea Butler, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Jemar Tisby.

Anthea Butler, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Jemar Tisby
Anthea Butler, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Jemar Tisby. (Photos: Torrence L. Neal; Deborah Hoag; Facebook/Jemar.Tisby)

This package features exclusive interviews with historians Anthea Butler, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Jemar Tisby about themes presented in their books that focus on Christianity, race, and gender:

  • Dr. Anthea Butler on How ‘Racism Is Part and Parcel’ of White Evangelicalism
  • Kristin Kobes Du Mez Talks Gendered Racism, White Patriarchy, and ‘Jesus and John Wayne’
  • Jemar Tisby Exposes US Christianity’s Racism From Columbus to Black Lives Matter

These interviews were conducted by our Associate Editor Timothy Isaiah Cho between 2019 and 2021 and published on faithfullymagazine.com.

This PDF package includes hyperlinked sources and audio/visual components. It can be read on a tablet, Kindle, laptop, desktop, smartphone (in landscape mode is best), and any other device that accepts PDFs. The file size is 2.7 MB.

You must be logged into your membership account to see use the download link below.

Faithfully Magazine Presents: Conversations on Christianity, History & Race features exclusive Q&As with Drs. Anthea Butler, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Jemar Tisby
Faithfully Magazine Presents: Conversations on Christianity, History & Race features exclusive Q&As with Drs. Anthea Butler, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Jemar Tisby.
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Written by FM Editors

Faithfully Magazine is a fresh, bold and exciting news and culture publication that covers issues, conversations and events impacting Christian communities of color.

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